2014 Nebraska Law Review Write-On Competition

This post contains materials for the 2014 University of Nebraska College of Law annual write-on competition.

This competition is open to UNL Law students who have completed their 1L year or are a transfer student, and have two (2) or more remaining (non-summer) semesters left. Further instructions are available in the attached materials.

If you have any questions, please contact Sarah Hindman, Research Editor, at sarahnhindman@gmail.com.

Best of luck!

Materials for 2014 Write-On Competition

 

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Regulators, Mount Up

Ben Trachtenberg[0]

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Improving Law School “Transparency”

Jeffrey Evans Stake[0]

Given their central role in the training and socialization of lawyers, law schools are uniquely obliged to present themselves honestly to the public and to their prospective students. In recent years, law schools have failed to live up to that simple standard. As Ben Trachtenberg documents in detail,[1] some law schools have lied or deliberately presented misleading information. More broadly, all law schools have followed the ABA mandate to report employment statistics that, until recently, were defined in ways that would have surprised many law school applicants. The ABA has taken steps to improve the flow of information from law schools to the public. It has punished perpetrators and reformed reporting rules. What more should be done?

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The Evaporating Trust in American Legal Education

Kyle P. McEntee [0]

I once overheard a non-lawyer tell a popular lawyer joke. How can you tell that an attorney is about to lie? Without missing a beat the jokester quipped. The attorney’s lips begin to move. The group found it funny, while I began to wonder what happened to my sense of humor. I smirked, sure, but more than anything the familiar joke diverted my attention from comedy to comity.

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Response Series: Ben Trachtenberg’s “Law School Marketing and Legal Ethics”

Issue 91 of the Nebraska Law Review features an article by Professor Ben Trachtenberg of the University of Missouri School of Law which details a recent and controversial topic within legal education: the release of misleading employment statistics by law school administrators. In Law School Marketing and Legal Ethics,[1] Professor Trachtenberg advocates a novel approach to combating this deceitful practice through the use of professional liability under Model Rule 8.4(c). As part of a special series of responses from other notable academics in the area, the Nebraska Law Review Bulletin is proud to publish the thoughts of Kyle McEntee of Law School Transparency and Professor Jeffrey Stake of Indiana University’s Mauer School of Law. In their responses, each author will detail his respective take on professional liability as advocated by Mr. Trachtenberg and offer an alternate approaches to combating the release of misleading employment statistics by law schools. Finally, Professor Trachtenberg will again offer his thoughts in a final response. Due to the unique nature of this series, the usual emphasis on word length for Bulletin submissions is downplayed in order to best retain the full substance of the contributing authors’ response.

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2013 Nebraska Law Review Write-On Competition Materials

Below you will find an attachment containing the materials for the 2013 University of Nebraska College of Law annual write-on competition.

This competition is only open to those students who have completed their 1L year, are a transfer student, or have two (2) or more remaining semesters left (summer sessions do not count). Further instructions are available in the attached materials.

If you have any questions, contact the Research Editor at cjpreston88@gmail.com.

Best of luck!

Portfolio of Materials for 2013 Write-On Competition

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Bullshit!: Why the Retroactive Application of Federal Rules of Evidence 413-414 and State Counterparts Violates the Ex Post Facto Clause

Colin Miller [0]

 

In State v. Kibbee, Eddie Kibbee brought an Ex Post Facto Clause challenge to his convictions for first-degree sexual assault and felony child abuse.[1] Kibbee was convicted for sexual acts committed against a sixteen year-old,[2] and if his ex post facto claim had been that the legislature rose the age of consent from sixteen to seventeen after his alleged crimes, he would have had a viable claim.  He also would have had a viable claim if his conduct was classified as second-degree sexual assault at the time of his alleged crimes or if he was sentenced to fifty years’ incarceration, but the maximum punishment for his crimes was only forty years at the time of commission.

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LB 36: A Shot in the Arm for Lethal Injection

LB 36: A Shot In The Arm For Lethal Injection

On May 28, 2009, the Nebraska Legislature passed LB 36, a statute instituting lethal injection as the method of executing death sentences.  The bill was introduced in December 2008 by Attorney General Jon Bruning in response to State v. Mata, a Nebraska Supreme Court case that declared the state’s electrocution procedure via the electric chair unconstitutional in February of that year.  The bill suggests a preference for what is commonly known as a three-drug “cocktail” to be used in the execution of death row inmates. The cocktail was originally created in Oklahoma in 1977, and has been widely adopted by several states across the nation. [1]

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White Paper: “School Sponsorship” and Hazelwood’s Protection of Student Speech: Appropriate for all Curriculum Contexts?

by: Adam Hoesing [0]

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Response IT’S ALL ACADEMIC: A Response to “Enforcement of Law Schools’ Non-Academic Honor Codes: A Necessary Step Towards Professionalism?” by Nicola A. Boothe-Perry

 

Response:

IT’S ALL ACADEMIC:

A Response to “Enforcement of Law Schools’ Non-Academic Honor Codes: A Necessary Step Towards Professionalism?” by Nicola A. Boothe-Perry

 

Jonah J. Horwitz [0]

Copyright © 2012.  Jonah J. Horwitz.  All rights reserved.

 

 

Most can readily agree with Professor Boothe-Perry that lawyers routinely act badly, and that they do so with a regularity that is, alarmingly, on the rise.  The question of what to do about it is a more vexing one.  Professor Boothe-Perry suggests that the problem can be nipped in the bud, as it were, through the imposition of non-academic honor codes at law schools. [1]  In this way, she argues, attorneys-in-training will learn how to behave themselves before they join the bar and will behave themselves ever after. [2]

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